Pic Alan Richardson Dundee, Pix-AR.co.uk
Free to Use
The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall joined with Scotland's first minister, veterans and serving soldiers at a service to commemorate 100 years since  one of the biggest battles of the First World War. An estimated 21,000 British soldiers died in the Battle of Loos in 1915, about 7,000 of whom were Scottish. A large number of casualties were from the Dundee-based 4th Black Watch. Prince Charles and Camilla joined about 1,000 people at a service in the city to pay their respects. The prince is the Royal Colonel of the 3rd Battalion (The Black Watch), The Royal Regiment of Scotland.
Pic Alan Richardson Dundee, Pix-AR.co.uk
Free to Use
The Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall joined with Scotland's first minister, veterans and serving soldiers at a service to commemorate 100 years since  one of the biggest battles of the First World War. An estimated 21,000 British soldiers died in the Battle of Loos in 1915, about 7,000 of whom were Scottish. A large number of casualties were from the Dundee-based 4th Black Watch. Prince Charles and Camilla joined about 1,000 people at a service in the city to pay their respects. The prince is the Royal Colonel of the 3rd Battalion (The Black Watch), The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

SCOTLAND TO REMEMBER BATTLES OF JUTLAND AND SOMME IN 2016

WWI commemorations in Scotland will continue in 2016 with events to mark the Battle of Jutland and the Battle of the Somme.

On Tuesday 31 May the Battle of Jutland will be commemorated in both Kirkwall, Orkney and Lyness, Hoy.

The Battle of Jutland was the only significant naval engagement of the First World War with over 100,000 sailors involved on 250 ships. More than 6,000 Royal Navy and 2,500 German sailors lost their lives.

On the evening of Thursday 30 June to the morning of Friday 1 July 2016 the Battle of the Somme will be commemorated by an overnight vigil in the Scottish National War Memorial, Edinburgh Castle.

The Battle of the Somme was the most devastating battle of the First World War, and many Scots were amongst those lost.

Further details on both events will be announced later in the year.

The events of 2016 follow a successful Commemorations Programme in 2015 which saw events take place in Gretna and Leith to mark the Quintinshill rail disaster, in Edinburgh and Stirling to mark Gallipoli, and in Dundee to mark the Battle of Loos. As part of the programme, the first of a series of seminars was held to give schoolchildren from all over Scotland an understanding of the significance of the First World War.

Cabinet Secretary for Culture, Europe and External Affairs, Fiona Hyslop, said:

“World War One had an enormous impact on Scotland, and on the world. With so many sent to fight, and so many lost, there can be no family in Scotland that was not touched by war – with huge sacrifices made by those who stayed at home, as well as those who fought.

“This year marks the centenary of both the Battle of Jutland – the only major naval engagement of the First World War – and the Battle of the Somme, the war’s most devastating battle, and it is right that we remember these.

“2015 saw the busiest year so far of the commemorations programme, with events held all over Scotland, and many thousands of people paused to remember the sacrifices made a century ago. I was particularly pleased to see so many young people taking part in the commemorations, and in our special education event – because it is so important that the next generation understands the impact of war.

“In 2016 Scotland’s five-year commemorations programme will continue, and we will continue to encourage people in all parts of Scotland to join with us to consider the impact of the First World War, which claimed the lives of more than 100,000 Scots and left many more injured or disabled.

“The First World War had a significant and broad impact on our nation. Through our national commemorations the people of Scotland will have opportunities to reflect on its lasting social and civic legacy.”